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Daily Archives: October 7, 2015

Alex Ross Perry’s new film Queen of Earth, a weird homage to the 1960s and 1970s psychodramas, had me thinking about this niche genre. It is a challenge to define. These are films that depict a psychological state through visual symbolism, a subjective camera or an unreliable narrator. Oftentimes these films play off of the contrasting duality of two central… Read more »

07 October 2015 | Features, Film Lists

The Pulitzer Prize is an award given for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. Some of these great, awarded works have been brought to the screen. Since the award was given in 1917, people have been adapting novels, plays, musicals, and more that have won this prestigious honor. These are some of the… Read more »

07 October 2015 | Features, Film Lists

Romantic comedies too often get a bad rap, especially among male viewers. Sure, there are some films with this label whose cheesy dialogue and lack of realism make them almost unwatchable, but there are plenty of clunkers that can be found in any film genre. Still, there are others that come along to remind us why we enjoy the movies:… Read more »

07 October 2015 | Features, Film Lists

Unfortunately, pollution, global warming, deforestation, the melting of the ice caps and other environmental topics are part of our day to day discussions and things just seem to be getting worse. Every day we hear, see or read something to indicate that the environment has suffered another defeat. Fortunately, there are people out there trying to make a difference; environment… Read more »

07 October 2015 | Features, Film Lists

The Lobster gets its epithet from its conscience-stricken central character, David (Colin Farrell), who has chosen the marine crustacean as the animal he will become if, after 45 days at the hotel resort he’s staying at, he hasn’t found a mate. His reasons for wanting to be a lobster are two fold; they have a very long lifespan and they’re… Read more »

07 October 2015 | Reviews

Hungarian director and screenwriter László Nemes makes an astonishing debut – one of the greatest in recent memory – with the heart-rending and brutal Holocaust drama, Son of Saul. Much to Nemes credit he manages to eschew all the usual clichés telling the story of Saul (Géza Röhrig, brilliant), a Hungarian Jew forced to help the Nazis in Auschwitz where… Read more »

07 October 2015 | Reviews